Thanksgivukkah 2013: A Holiday Menu Mashup - recipes for this once in a lifetime holiday!

You’ve heard the hype – Hanukkah, the Jewish festival of lights, and Thanksgiving, American holiday of gratitude and feasting, coincide for the first and only Thanksgivukkah of our lifetimes. Complementary flavor profiles make a mashup of each holiday’s iconic foods totally delicious and a great way to shake up the holidays- after all, you won’t get the chance for another 70,000 years! This collection of Kosher-friendly (learn easy substitutes here) is our ideal Thanksgivukkah menu, perfect whether you’re a Jew, Gentile, or define yourself as anything in between. Spin some dreidels, shmooze with the relatives, and nosh on turkey- happy holidays to all!

 

Starter

Chestnut Hummus with Thanksgiving Pita Chips: We know, we know, not ANOTHER variety of hummus. Homemade Thanksgivified pita chips seasoned with the same spices used for your turkey rub complement the prominent chestnut flavor of the hummus. Best used to keep the hungry guests at bay while you put finishing touches on the rest of the meal! (recipe and photo from Busy in Brooklyn)

Chestnut Hummus with Thanksgiving Pita Chips plus other Thanksgivukkah recipes

 

Main Course

Roast Turkey with Pears and Sage: Let’s face it – Thanksgiving’s not Thanksgiving without a turkey gracing the center of the table. Turkey won’t be the only star of a Thanksgivukkah meal but pears and sage together make this bird a knockout that will stand out from the crowd. (recipe and photo from Adventures in Cooking)

Roast Turkey with Pears and Sage plus other Thanksgivukkah recipes

 

Sides

Pumpkin Challah: Ditch the dinner rolls and gather close around the table to snag your bit of challah. Instead of individual servings, in many households each person tears off a piece of the loaf after reciting the blessing over the bread. Bonus? You can use a tester loaf for one of our desserts below! (recipe and photo from Shiksa in the Kitchen)

Pumpkin Challah plus other Thanksgivukkah recipes

 

Challah Stuffing with Turkey Sausage, Leeks and Cherries: Traditional Jewish egg bread provides a hearty backbone for this overloaded filling without the difficulty of making a whole turkey. (recipe and photo from The Little Ferraro Kitchen)

Challah Stuffing with Turkey Sausage, Leeks and Cherries plus other Thanksgivukkah recipes

 

Sweet Potato Noodle Kugel: You may trade in your marshmallows for noodles but with a crunchy brown sugar crusted topping, these potatoes definitely stay sweet. (recipe and photo from Rhubarb and Honey)

Sweet Potato Noodle Kugel plus other Thanksgivukkah recipes

 

Potato Latkes Topped with Turkey and Cranberry Chutney: Mashed potatoes? Those are so plain-old Thanksgiving. Crispy fried latkes are the way to go and act as a bed for the essential meat on turkey day!  (recipe and photo from The Girl in the Little Red Kitchen)

Potato Latkes Topped with Turkey and Cranberry Chutney plus other Thanksgivukkah recipes

 

Mom’s Tzimmes (Tsimis): There may not be a green bean casserole on the table, but according to Stef, tzimmes is the Jewish equivalent. Normally served for Rosh Hashanah, roasted carrots and sweet potatoes are combined with dried and canned fruits in this family recipe. (recipe and photo from The Cupcake Project)

Mom’s Tzimmes (Tsimis) plus other Thanksgivukkah recipes

 

Dessert

Chocolate Acorn Dreidels: Playing with your food is highly encouraged if you’re going to spin the dreidel with these top-esque, seasonally styled cookie sandwiches! (recipe and photo from The Hob-bee Hive)

Chocolate Acorn Dreidels plus other Thanksgivukkah recipes

 

Sweet Potato Pie Doughnut Holes: Sufganiyot, a type of jelly-filled doughnuts, may be the customary Hanukkah treat, but these bite-sized doughnut holes are both vegan and no-bake- more dessert and less guilt! (recipe and photo from Cooking for Luv)

Sweet Potato Pie Doughnut Holes plus other Thanksgivukkah recipes

Individual Challah Bread Puddings with Golden Raisins and Eggnog-Spiced Rum Sauce: Would the holidays be complete without a splash of booze? We couldn’t resist just one more challah recipe- to make this even more perfectly in the spirit of Thanksgivukkah, try using the same pumpkin challah recipe from the big dinner!  (recipe and photo from The Cozy Apron)

Challah Bread Pudding with Golden Raisins and Eggnog Spiced Rum Sauce plus other Thanksgivukkah recipes

Drink

Mulled Wine: While normally most popular later in the year, with Hanukkah coming so early, we don’t see any reason why we shouldn’t indulge ourselves with a glass of rich mulled wine to ward against this chilly season! (recipe and photo from turmeric n’ spice)

Mulled Wine plus other Thanksgivukkah recipes